Tag: Quilt Techniques

Better Bias Binding

Some quilters use bias binding all the time, for everything. I understand it is a cleaner finish, molds to the edge of the quilt, and provides more fibers on the edge of the binding. For all of these attributes, I must admit, I don’t use it all that often.

Bias binding, for me, is something I consider when I want to use a bias stripe or if I’m binding a quilt with unusual edges. Since those two things don’t occur all that often for me, I usually need a refresher on bias binding before I begin cutting.

I liken it to the first two steps in paper piecing, when I haven’t done paper piecing in a while. Mastering those first two pieces can take me the LONGEST time. Once my brain grasps it, I’m good to go – but it takes me some time.

Since I AM from the Show-Me state, I do like a good tutorial. It doesn’t have to be a video, but I usually like pictures. How about you?

Image of cutting bias binding

So if you are need of a refresher in cutting and using the bias binding, here is what you’ll learn:

  • How to cut bias strips
  • How to cut one continuous bias strip
  • The difference between single and double bias

Check out these tutorials about bias binding on Pinterest:

Need a fast straight binding solution for your quilt? Check out Lickety-Split Binding HERE!

How about using bias of a stripe for a flange?

Here’s a glimpse of a new pattern made from an old pattern coming soon! Here I have laid out the pieced top and auditioned an outer flange and bias binding. The bias flange is accenting the center of the quilt.

Image of bias binding and flange
Image of Tree Wall Hanging
SHOP JOY and all the #usebothsides patterns in my Etsy shop – Click HERE

Follow me on Pinterest HERE. Subscribe to The Buzz below.

Follow me on Instagram and Facebook, too!

Watch for the new quilt pattern (shown above) coming soon!

Quilting Resolutions

Are UFOs, PIGS, or WIPs a part of your New Years Quilting Resolutions?

UnFinished Objects, Projects in Grocery Sacks, and Works in Progress can weigh a quilter down if she or he isn’t careful!

Maybe you could use this easy binding technique to get some of your projects out of the way and off your mind. The Lickety-Split Quilt Binding makes that last big step go quickly and looks smart!

When I have “git-er-done” quilts on my quilting resolutions list, this is my go-to technique. This technique provides a 2 1/4″ or a 2″ binding (for mini quilts) options for those quilts that don’t require a hand-turned binding. See this original binding method here – it finishes a larger than 2 1/2 inch size binding.

What’s nice about this machine stitched binding is that it gives your quilt a tiny burst of contrasting color between the quilt and the binding, appearing to be piping or a “micro-flange”. This also gives your needle a perfect nesting line for stitching on.

Image of Quilting Resolutions

How to:

2 1/4 ” binding: Cut main binding strips 1 1/4″ width and cut the accent strips (piping look) slightly larger at 1 1/2″ width.

2″ binding: Cut main binding strips 1 1/8″ width and cut the accent strips (piping look) slightly larger at 1 3/8″.

Simply cut your strips, sew them end to end and press like normal binding. Do this for both sets of strips. Then, with right sides together, sew your long strips, press the seam to the binding color.

With the seam facing down, align the edge of the binding along the edge of your quilt and stitch a scant 1/4 inch seam (or smaller than your final stitch seam. Lastly, using bobbin thread that matches your backing and upper thread to match the accent, turn your binding to the front of your quilt and stitch in the ditch between the two fabrics. You might use a seam guide and adjust your needle position to a comfortable spot.

And just like that – your binding is finished – Lickety Split!

Here’s to your health, happiness, and many finished quilts in 2020!

Need a new project? Shop more than 40 patterns at Creative Bee Studios that use BOTH beautiful sides of your fabric!

Prairie Point Hanging Method

Discover a quick quilt hanging method to display your quilts!

Let’s face it…quilts take time. We really should cherish each step of the process. But, if you’re like me, it’s those last few steps that sometimes really test your patience:

Firstly, the binding…

Then the label…

Last, the SLEEVE…ugh!

Now, here is a fast, easy way to attach a hanging sleeve, with just a few quick points – Prairie Points!

Start with a few squares of fabric, fold them diagonally twice and lay them on your quilt. Next, baste with your machine, using a seam width that is smaller than your binding seam. Lastly, stitch the points by hand with just a few stitches! That’s it! It’s that easy.

Now let’s break it down:

For instance, if you have a small wall hanging, 5 inch squares will do.  But if you have a large quilted wall hanging, 12 – 16 inch squares will work.  The number you need depends on how large you make them and the size of your quilt. You’ll see, as soon as you fold one and hold it up to your quilt, how many you’ll need. This method is so much faster and easier that the traditional “sleeve”, you’ll be looking forward to using this method on your quilts!

So, for this tiny wall hanging (11  inches wide), I am using two five-inch squares.

Easy Method for Hanging Quilts

For small pieces, I like to use an even number of triangles so that the center is open for hanging it on one hook or nail. Of course, larger pieces need to be hung by two points, so the number of triangles attached to the quilt depend only on how many you want to add. For example, my 90 -inch wide quilt has 7 triangles which started with 12 1/2 inch squares.

Also great about this method, if you have a particularly heavy quilt to hang, you can add additional rod support in the center of your quilt in between two triangles.

To begin, fold a square diagonally once, press. Fold that triangle

Folded twice from square.
Folded twice from square.

diagonally again, press. Do this for all of the squares. Secondly, lay them at the top of your quilt, cut edge, lining up with the top edge of your quilt sandwich. Pin in place. Next, machine baste within the seam of your binding (whether the binding is on yet or not). Lastly, use a needle and thread (I like to use doubled thread for this) to stitch down each point, securing with several stitches.

Finally, attach and turn binding as usual and your quilt is ready to hang!

Image of Quilt Hanging Method

All Creative Bee Studios patterns provide Prairie Point Hanging Method instructions. Shop Patterns HERE.

Learn more about Creative Bee Studios #usebothsides patterns here.

Learn about NEW textiles, merchandise and MORE at Uncork the BUBBLES!

JOIN The BUZZ and follow Creative Bee Studios on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest!